Brief Communications: A Brief Report On The IV World Congress On Mummy Studies by Guido P. Lombardi: Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine, Vol.3, No. 1, January - June 2002
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Ref: Lombardi GP. A Brief Report On The IV World Congress On Mummy Studies. Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, 2002; Vol. 3, No. 1 (January - June 2002): ; Published: February 7, 2002, (Accessed: 

Anil Aggrawal's Internet Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

Volume 3, Number 1, January - June 2002

Brief Communications

A Brief report on the IV World Congress on Mummy Studies

-Guido P. Lombardi, MD, MA.
Associate Researcher, Cátedra Pedro Weiss
Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia
Jose Olaya 135,
Salamanca, Lima - 3
Perú
Email: guido_lombardi@hotmail.com


From September 4th to 10th 2001, the city of Nuuk, Greenland's capital, hosted very successfully the most recent gathering of experts on mummies and paleopathology in the world. This important event was possible thanks to Greenland National Museum and Archives as well as the support from numerous other institutions from both Greenland and Denmark. The presidents of the scientific committee, Drs. Niels Lynnerup and Conrado Rodríguez - Martín, did also a great work setting up all the presentations of the conference

At the opening ceremony all participants were welcomed by Prof. Emil Rosing, Director of Greenland National Museum and Archives; Ms. Lise Skifte Lennert, Greenland's Minister of Culture, Education, Research and Church, and by Ms. Agnethe Davidsen, Mayor of Nuuk. On behalf of the attendees, Drs. Lynnerup and Rodríguez - Martín acknowledged the hosts' welcome. This ceremony was held at the venue for the congress, Katuaq Cultural Centre, a beautifully designed building downtown Nuuk. Afterwards, we were kindly invited by Mayor Davidsen to attend a dinner party at the City Hall.

The papers presented at the congress were organized into the following sessions:

Greenland, Arctic Archaeology and Cultural History


*Life on the Edge: Cultural History of Arctic North America and Greenland. Peter Schledermann, The Arctic Institute of North America, University of Calgary.
*Burials and Inuit Archeology in Greenland. Claus Andreasen, Greenland National Museum and Archives, Nuuk.

Greenland and Arctic Mummies. A Symposium in Memory of Jens P. Hart Hansen

Guido P. Lombardi

 Dr. Lombardi
Guido P. Lombardi is a paleopathologist associated to the Cátedra Pedro Weiss at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, and an active member of the Paleopathology Association. He completed his medical studies at the Cayetano Heredia University (UPCH) in 1992. There, with the advice of Dr. Uriel García - Cáceres, he completed the study of a Peruvian mummy from the Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Antropología e Historia del Perú (MNAAHP) (National Museum of Archaeology, Anthropology and History of Peru): "Autopsia de una Momia Nasca: Estudio Paleopatológico (Autopsy of a Nasca Mummy: Paleopathological Study)."
This study was awarded by the Alberto Hurtado Medical School with the "Francisco Tejada - Semíramis Reátegui" Annual Prize (Name of a very prestigious Medical Annual Prize) which lead to a second study: "Presencia de Mycobacterium tuberculosis en una Momia Nasca: Evidencia Paleopatológica" (Presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Nasca Mummy: Paleopathological Evidence). Both mummies are now on permanent display at the MNAAHP.
Dr. Lombardi was awarded an M.A. degree in Anthropology from Tulane University in 1999, after his defense of the thesis: "Egyptian Mummies at Tulane University: An Anthropological Study." He has attended the II, III and IV World Congresses on Mummy Studies in Cartagena, Colombia; Arica, Chile; and Nuuk, Greenland. Dr. Lombardi academic activities include both research and teaching.


*The Mummies from Qilakitsoq. Niels Lynnerup, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*X-Ray Analysis of Six Mummies from Pisissarfik, Greenland. Tina Sørensen, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*Global Warming. Receeding Permafrost and Medical Archaeology. Peter Lewin, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
*Mummies of the Arctic Regions: An Overview. Michael Zimmerman, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.
*The Aleutian mummies at the Smithsonian Institution: Acquisition, Description and Historical Perspectives. David Hunt, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
*New Orleans' Aleut Mummy: A Unangan Hero? Guido Lombardi and John Verano, Laboratorio de Paleopatología, Cátedra Pedro Weiss, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú and Tulane University, New Orleans, U.S.A.

Mummification Methods and Free Communications


*Did the Chinchorro people momify their fetuses? Fact or Fiction. Bernardo Arriaza, University of Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.A.
*Skull Overmodelling and Ritual Brain Extraction Among Indians of Northeastern Colombia. Felipe Cárdenas - Arroyo. Fundación Erigaie, Bogotá, Colombia.
*The Study of the State of Preservation of mummified tissue from Later Period mummies through histological, histochemical and immunological techniques. Despina Moissidou, Laboratory Medicine Academic Group, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*The Origin of Finns. Heikki S. Vourinen, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki; History Department, University of Tampere, Finland.
*Determination of Age at Death of the Tyrolean Iceman. Torstein Sjövold and Othmar Gaber, University of Stockholm, Sweden and University of Innsbruck, Austria.

Dr. Dan Brothwell Presentation (Guest Speaker)


*The Study of Ancient Well Preserved Bodies in the New Millennium. Departmernt of Archaeology, University of York, United Kingdom.

Bog Bodies


*Bog Bodies in Germany and the Netherlands. Winjand van der Sanden, Erfgoedhuis van Drenthe, The Netherlands.
*Bodies and Skeletons from Danish Bogs. Do They Tell the Same Story? Pia Bennike, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*A Brief Overview of the Paleopathology of Northwest European Bog Bodies. Heather Gill - Robinson, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
*The Histological Investigation of the Peat Preserved Head of "Worsey Man." John Denton et al., Musculoskeletal Research Group and Manchester Museum, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*The Grauballe Man. A Well Preserved Bog Body from de Iron Age. Old and New Investigations. Pauline Asingh, Moesgård Museum, Århus, Denmark.
*A Well-Preserved Bog Body from Huldremose in Denmark, Ignored for 100 years. Pia Bennike, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*How Unreliable are Radiocarbon Dates of Bog Bodies? Wijnand van der Sanden, Erfgoedhuis van Drenthe, The Netherlands.
*Taphonomic Change to the Buried Body and Associated Materials in an Upland Peat Environment: Experiments Using Pig Carcasses as Human-Body Analogues on Oxenhope Moor, near Bradford, England. Robert Janaway et al., Department of Archaeological Sciences, Bradford University, United Kingdom.
*Immortal Images. Ancient Anthropomorphic Wood Carvings from Northern and Northwest Europe. Christian Fischer, Silkeborg Museum, Denmark.

Hair in Archaeology


*Survival and Alteration - Experiments in Hair Degradation. Andrew Wilson et al., Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
*The Analysis of Hair Associated with the Neolithic Iceman of the Tyrol. Don Brothwell and Geoffery Grinie, Department of Archaeology, University of York, and Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
*Trace Elements in Historic Greenlandic Hair Samples. Jens C. Hansen and G. Asmund, Centre of Arctic Environmental Medicine, University of Aarhus and Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
*Trace Element Analysis of Ancient Human Hair from Fayum Egypt. Marvin Kuchar et al., Department of Chemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, U.S.A.
*Hallucinogenic Compound Identification in Ancient Human Hair. M. M. Castro et al., Departamento de Antropología, Universidad de Chile, Santiago.
*The Predictive Value of Cocaine Hair/Visceral Tissue Ratios in Andean Mummies. Larry Cartmell, Valley View Regional Hospital, Ada, Oklahoma, U.S.A.

Conservation and Museology


*A New Method of Conservation of the Iceman in the Archaeological Museum in Bolzano. Eduard Egarter Vigl, Archaeological Museum of South Tyrol, Bolzano, Italy.
*Conservation of Mummified Bodies of Archaeological and Forensic Origin by Means of the Application of Complucad Arene. M. Miquel - Feucht et al., Forensic Anthropology And Paleopathology Laboratory, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.
*The Ancient Egyptian Mummies: Histological Examinations to Estimate the Presence of Contaminants or Pollutants. Emma Rabino - Massa et al., Laboratory of Anthropology, Department of Animal and Human Biology, University of Turin.
*Mummified Human Remains from South Africa, Issues of Research. Maryna Steyn, Department of Anatomy, University of Pretoria, South Africa.
*Death on Museum. How Do We Handle the Exhibition of a Bog Body? Pauline Asingh, Moesgård Museum, Århus, Denmark.
*Eyhical Considerations about Exhibiting Dead Human Beings. Joel Berglund, The Greenland National Museum and Archives, Nuuk, Greenland.
CONGRESS YEAR VENUE
1st World Congress February 3-6, 1992 Tenerife, Canary Islands
2nd World Congress February 6-10, 1995 Cartagena, Colombia
3rd World Congress May 18-22, 1998 Arica, Chile
4th World Congress September 4-10, 2001 Nuuk, Greenland
5th World Congress 2004 Torino, Italy, (to be held)
A full listing of all previous Congresses on Mummy Studies (and the next one)

Paleopathology


*Foot Paleopathology in Guanche Mummies from the Canary Islands (Spain). Conrado Rodríguez - Martin, Instituto Canario de Bioantropología, OAMC - Cabildo de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain.
*Perspectives about Malaria on Egyptian Remains from Gebelen site. Emma Rabino Massa et al., Department of Animal and Human Biology, University of Turin.
*Paleoepidemiology of American Trypanosomiasis: A Progress Report. Arthur C. Aufderheide et al., Paleobiology Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Duluth, U.S.A.
*Use of Histo- and Immunopathological Methods to Investigate Cellular and Matrix Componentes in Tissue Samples from Egyptian Mummies. M. Jeziorska et al., Musculoskeletal Research Group, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*Adolescent Pregnancy and Death: A Case from an Egyptian Mummy at Tulane University, New Orleans. Guido Lombardi, Guido P. Lombardi, Laboratorio de Paleopatología, Cátedra Pedro Weiss, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú.
*Mummies from the Tomb of Parennefer, Valley of the Nobles, Egypt. Patrick D. Horne, Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases, University of Toronto, Canada.
*Roman Period Mummification in Egypt's Western Desert. Arthur C. Aufderheide et al., Paleobiology Laboratory, University of Minnesota, Duluth, U.S.A.
*X-Ray Analysis of Seven Peruvian Dog Mummies from the Moquegua Valley, Chiribaya Culture. Katharina Dittmar and Sonia Guillén, University of Leipzig, Veterinary Faculty, Germany and Centro Mallqui, Ilo, Perú.
*Dental Pathological Condition of the Mummies from the 18th - 19th Centuries, Hungary. I. Szikossy et al., Department of Anthropology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Budapest, Hungary.
*Neurology in Ancient Faces. Otto Appenzeller et al., NMHEMC Research Foundation, Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A.
*Osteological Analyses of Five Moche Giants from Dos Cabezas, Peru. Alana Cordy - Collins, Anthropology Program, University of San Diego, U.S.A.
*Age, Sex, and Health History in a Basketmaker Mummy from the Cimarron Valley, New Mexico, with Lessions Suggesting a Nasal Polyp. Della C. Cook, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University, U.S.A.

Applied Technology and Analytical Methods


*DNA Analysis - A Tool to Help Reconstructing the Past. Søren Nørby, Laboratory for Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*ADNA Analyses of Dorset, Thule, Sadlermiut, and Aleut Samples from Prehistoric North America. Dennis O'Rourke, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, U.S.A.
*Molecular Analysis of the Kwaday Dän Sinchi Ancient Remains Found in a Glacier in Canada. Vicki Monsante, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Canada.
*The Qilakitsoq Mummies: Family Relations Reexamined by DNA - profiling. Hanna Hansen, Department of Forensic Genetics, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*Ancient DNA and the Study of Mummified Tissues. Tom Gilbert and Alan Cooper, Ancient Biomolecules Centre, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, U.K.
*Studies on Parts of the 28S rDNA of 1000-year Old Fleas (Pulex sp.), Recovered from Animal Mummies from the Preincaic Chiribaya Culture, Southern Peru. Katharina Dittmar, University of Leipzig, Institute of Parasitology, Veterinary Faculty, Germany.
*Widespread Occurrence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis - DNA from 18th - 19th Century Hungarians. Mark Spigelman, Department of Medical Microbiology, University College London, United. Kingdom.
*CT Examinations of 31 Mummies from the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, U.S.A. Birna Jonsdottir, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
*3D Volume Rendering with a Multislice Computed Tomography of Mummified Human Remains from the Egyptian Museum of Turin (Italy). Frederico Cesarani et al., Department of Radiology, University of Turin, San Giovanni Battista - Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy.
*The Facial Reconstruction of Egyptian Mummies and Comparison with the Fayum Portraits. Caroline Wilkinson, Unit of Art in Medicine, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*The Ice Man, Preservation and Endoscopy. Othmar Gaber, University of Innsbruck, Austria.

Mortuary Archaeology


*South American Funerary Practices and Archaeology: A View from the Context of Death. Felipe Cárdenas - Arroyo, Fundación Erigaie, Bogotá, Colombia.
*Burials Types as a Means of Political Interaction and Ethnic Boundaries in the South Central Andes (A.D. 1000 - 1500). Calogero Santoro, Departamento de Arqueología y Museología, Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile.
*Mortuary Practices and Social Complexity in Prehispanic Colombia. Christobal Gnecco, Department of Anthropology, Universidad del Cauca, Popayán, Colombia.
*Chachapoyas Dry Bones and Inka Mummies: When Did Death Occur? Jane Buikstra, University of New Mexico, U.S.A.
*Mallquis from the Peruvian Andean Cloud Forest: Recovery, Curation and Study. Sonia Guillén, Centro Mallqui, Ilo, Perú.
*Mortuary Practices and Mummification in the Ancient Near East. Ingolf Thuesen, Carsten Niebuhr Instituttet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*Scientific Examinations of the "Saltman:" A Natural Mummy from Western Iran. Rasool Vatandoust, Research Center for Conservation of Cultural Relics (RCCCR), Iranian Cultural Heritage Organization, Tehran, Iran.
*The Mummified Bodies of the Royal Family of León (Spain): An Anthropological, Paleopathological and Conservational Study of Four Mummified Bodies from the XI - XII Century. M. Polo - Cerdá et al., Forensic Anthropology and Paleopathology Laboratory, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.
*Naturally Mummified Individuals from the 18 - 19th Centuries, Vác, Hungary. Ildiko Pap et al., Department of Anthropology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Budapest, Hungary.
*Aleut Mortuary Practices: New Approaches in Recostructing Burial Customs. Bruno Frohlich, Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
*Death and Burial in Ancient Egypt: New Discoveries in the History of Ancient Egyptian Mummification. Salima Ikram, American University in Cairo, Egypt.
*The Tomb of the Two Brothers at Rifeh, Egypt: Palaeopathological and Archaeological Studies. Rosalie David, The Manchester Museum, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*Anthropological Analysis of Mummified Burials from Saqqara (Egypt). Maria Kaczmarek, Institute of Anthropology, A. Mickiewicz University, Pozna, Poland.

The Frozen Inca Mummies from Mount Llullaillaco (Northwest Argentina)


*The Frozen Mummies on Mount Llullaillaco. Bob Brier, C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University, New York, U.S.A.
*The First Steps Towards the Recuperation and Conservation of the Mummies. Constanza Ceruti, CONICET, Instituto de Investigaciones de Alta Montaña, Universidad Católica de Salta, Argentina.
*Archaeological Find of Three Frozen Mummies and Offering Assemblages from the Inca Ceremonial Complex. Contanza Ceruti, CONICET, Instituto de Investigaciones de Alta Montaña, Universidad Católica de Salta, Argentina.
*The Qhapaq Hucha Sacrifices of the Inka Empire. Thomas Besom, Department of Anthropology, Binghamton University (SUNY), Binghamton, New York, U.S.A.
*A Radiographic Study of Three Frozen Mummies. Carlos Previgliano, Universidad Católica de Salta, Argentina.
*Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Analysis of Inca Mummies from Argentina. Keith McKenney, School of Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, U.S.A.
*Hair Analysis of the Mummies of Mount Llullaillaco. Larry Cartmell, Valley View Regional Hospital, Ada, Oklahoma, U.S.A.

Poster Session


*Chemical and Physical Changes observed in Heated Bones. Jane Richter and Noline Kalsbeek, School of Conservation, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Copenhagen, Denmark.
*Schistosomiasis in Modern and Ancient Tissues. Patricia Rutherford, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*Computed Tomography at the Smithsonian Institution: Application and Evaluation. Bruno Frølich et al., Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., U.S.A.
*An Anthropological and Conservational Study of a Mummified Head from Egypt (I Century AD). M. Miquel - Feucht et al., Forensic Anthropology and Paleopathology Laboratory, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.
*The Mummies from Castielfabid (18th Century): Anthropological, Paleopathological and Conservational Studies. M. Polo - Cerdá et al., Forensic Anthropology and Paleopathology Laboratory, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.
*The Mummy of the Botet Collection of Valencia: An Anthropological, Paleopathological and Conservational Study of a Pre-Columbian Mummy. M. Miquel - Feucht et al., Forensic Anthropology and Paleopathology Laboratory, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.
*The Infanta María de León (Spain): A Paleopathological and Conservational Study of a Mummified Body from the 12th Century. M. Polo - Cerdá et al., Forensic Anthropology and Paleopathology Laboratory, Universidad de Valencia, Spain.
*Gas Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Egyptian Mummies in the Manchester Museum Collection. Louise Sutherland, University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
*Natural Mummified Bodies from the 17th to 19th Centuries from Elsinore, Denmark. Lone Hvass and Pia Bennike, The Town Museum of Elsinore and the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
*Mummy Mismatch. Niels Lynnerup, Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

It would be difficult to write about the highlights of this event without skipping something important. Since the actual contents of most of the papers presented in Nuuk will be printed in the Proceedings of the Congress, I just like to refer to the three very special events apart from the listed papers:
*Ms. Susanne Hart-Hansen personal presentation about her late husband, Dr. Jens Peder Hart-Hansen. Dr. Hart-Hansen had been the original organizer of the meeting in Greenland.
*The visit to the Greenland National Museum & Archives. There most of us, in respectful silence, stared at the famous Greenland Mummies. I personally spent a long time alone admiring mummy I/1, the six month old baby that has been the front cover of many publications.
*September 11, 2001 had been an unforgettable day for us. We visited glacier Russell, and ate a whale and musk ox barbecue. Reality hit us on our way back to the Kangerlussuaq airport. We will not forget the international solidarity we all shared during the following days we got stranded. Our deepest thankfulness has to go to Greenlandair, which scheduled a special flight to take us back to Iqaluit, Canada.

On-line resources


*Greenland Incoming   (www.gi.gl)
*Paleopathology Association   (www.paleopathology.org)
*Katuaq Cultural Center, Nuuk   (www.katuaq.gl)

Finally, I would like to thank our hosts in Greenland in behalf of all attendees for their wonderful job. By the way, the next World Congress on Mummy Studies (The fifth) is in Torino in Italy in 2004. See you all there!

 Contact Dr. Lombardi by clicking here,


 N.B. It is essential to read this journal - and especially this piece as it contains several tables and high resolution graphics - under a screen resolution of 1600 x 1200 dpi or more. If the resolution is less than this, you may see broken or overlapping tables/graphics, graphics overlying text or other anomalies. It is strongly advised to switch over to this resolution to read this journal - and especially this review. These pages are viewed best in Netscape Navigator 4.7 and above.

-Anil Aggrawal


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